This is a mandatory qualification for Licensing Board Members to help you expand your knowledge base and improve your contributions to the Licensing Board.

The full day, comprehensive training is also useful for other people involved in the licensing process, such as Licensing Board administration staff, lawyers, or police.

What to expect:

  • Understanding the important role of licensing, alongside other key alcohol policies in tackling Scotland’s high levels of alcohol-related harm
  • Knowledge of how to ensure your board’s policy and practice contribute to improved outcomes at local and national level
  • Increased clarity of your role

“Our trainer was brilliant at explaining everything to us. I enjoyed the day and feel like I now have a sound understanding of the role and responsibilities of the licensing board.” 

Course details:

  • No entrance requirements
  • 1-day course with pre-course and follow-up home study
  • Course content is specified by the Scottish Government and covers an introduction to licensing, responsible operation of licensed premises, the effect of irresponsible operation on society and health
  • 40 question multiple choice assessment completed following the training session, awarded by Alcohol Focus Scotland and accredited by Scottish Qualifications Authority for the purposes of the Licensing (Scotland) Act 2005
  • The Alcohol Focus Scotland publication Licensing Board Members Guidebook will be issued to candidates electronically for pre-course reading

Please note that if the training takes place virtually, the assessment will be held virtually. If the training takes place in person, the assessment will also be held in person.

All licensing board members are required to complete the training and pass an exam within three months of being elected to a licensing board.

In 2022 we trained almost 350 Councillors who were joining their local licensing board.

Get in touch for more information

Email training@alcohol-focus-scotland.org.uk

Call 0141 572 6700  

The figures

1 in 15
deaths in Scotland is caused by alcohol
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